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Idealog—in the ideas business

200 Best Packaging Design Worldwide: A book that packs some serious packaging punch

200 Best Packaging Design Worldwide

By Luerzer's Archive

As well as being a rather convenient form of product containment, packaging can be an artwork in and of itself, regardless of what’s contained inside it. And the book  200 Best packaging Design Worldwide, by Luerzer's Archive, showcases the most curvy, funky, colourful and knock-out packaging designs to have ever been created. In fact, some of the packaging is so good, you’d be happy to own the packaging on its own, irrespective of what’s inside. 

So how do you go about selecting only 200 designs out of a whole galaxy of creations? Mitch Nash, the founder of Blue Q and one of the judges who helped select the work featured in the book, sums it up well when he says: “Good packaging design better have the element of surprise, or forget it.” 

As you unfold the cover, you’ll find a handy index of all the designers featured in the book, with information that includes the design firm/agency they work for, their location, category and where exactly you’ll find their swanky design submissions in the book. Alternatively, the contents page breaks down the design via the categories of beverages , CD design, cigars/cigarettes, cosmetics, fashion, food, house & garden, office equipment, pharmaceuticals, publishers/media, shopping bags and—deep breath—miscellaneous. 

So if you’re looking for some inspiration or you simply want to marvel at how ordinary products can be pimped up by packaging, this book is definitely worth a good scour. 

You can win your own copy HERE.

Here’s a few of our favourites below (it was a tough ask just to pick 4): 

Top left: wine packaging ‘Let it grow’ by Danilo Tranquilli; top right: takeaway food packaging by Michael Vinesegg; bottom left: carton packaging for kids  t-shirt by Henry Ho; bottom right: Puma table-tennis packaging by Johan Liden.


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Comments

I love the idea of using your product’s packaging to not only keep your product intact, but also to sell your product by intriguing the potential consumers. Too many times, companies undermine the importance of the packaging of the items. They forget that the package has to be attractive enough for passer-bys to stop in their tracks and pick it up. The packaging should not be seen as a mindless storage area. It is also a form of marketing tool and advertisement. I think this book will give a brilliant insight to some of the creative packagings around.


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